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TIBC

Clinical significance

Increased values of TIBC and UIBC are very important in differential diagnosis of anemias caused by iron deficiency, infection or tumor.

1. Physiologic variations in TIBC:
• In infants, TIBC decreases in the immediate postnatal period; later, it increases to reach values of up to 71.6 μmol/L.
• In normal pregnancy, TIBC rises to about 80.1 μmol/L, while iron concentration decreases. UIBC is elevated in pregnant women.

2. Pathologic changes in TIBC:

Increased TIBC values Decreased TIBC values
• active portal cirrhosis,
• acute and subacute necrosis of the liver,
• acute hepatitis
• acute tonsillitis
• acute and chronic blood loss,
• ancylostomiasis,
• benign neoplasm of stomach,
• cancer of rectum,
• carcinoma of the kidney,
• celiac disease,
• chronic active hepatitis,
• gastric cancer,
• hemochromatosis,
• hemolytic anemia,
• hereditary spherocytosis,
• iron deficiency anemia,
• peptic ulcer,
• strongyloidasis,
• thalassaemia minor and major,
• ulcerative colitis,
• viral hepatitis,
• Whipple’s disease.
• acute and chronic infections,
• anemia of chronic disease,
• aplastic anemia,
• cancer of uterus,
• carcinoma of the kidney,
• carcinoma of the lungs,
• congenital transferrinaemia
• folic acid deficiency,
• Hodgkin’s disease,
• hypothyroidism,
• iron deficiency anemia,
• kwashiorkor,
• liver cirrhosis,
• malaria,
• metastatic tumor,
• nephrotic syndrome,
• non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma,
• pernicious anemia in relapse,
• protein malnutrition,
• rheumatoid arthritis,
• scurvy,
• septicemia,
• sideroblastic anemia,
• uremia.
• vitamin B6 deficiency anemia.